Community Defense & the Elements of Soft Power

In case you haven’t already read it, there’s an excellent article up at Guerrillamerica regarding how to leverage something called soft power through influence and persuasion.

For individuals and communities preparing for a future that incorporates violence and morally ambiguous situations, to omit developing soft power is an unwise move. We can imagine lots of realistic scenarios in which soft power will enable us to achieve or maintain security: gaining the trust of community members to contribute to the security effort, working with local authorities to fight known threats, sharing information with neighboring communities and security groups, and persuading at-risk segments of a community to not support threat elements.

How can we develop soft power as a part of community defense? First, focus on your reputation. There are militias, security teams and prepper groups that have poor reputations, stemming from poor leadership, unrealistic, unethical or immoral goals, past indiscretions, and incompetence. When cooperation is a necessity for community defense, these groups are going to have a much more difficult time finding partners to push in the same direction. You don’t want to be a security partner of last resort with a team reluctant to work with you.

Read the whole thing.

Rapport and Influence Part 2: RASCLS

Last week in Part 1 we talked about the need for rapport, and how crucial it is to foster it and use it to create influence networks that we can leverage to get things done, collect intelligence, or simply to have people available who can help you when you need it..  The next logical question is “How, exactly, do I influence others?” That’s what we’ll be talking about today.  There are six tools—weapons of influence, as they’re known—that you can use to build influence in your relationships with other patriots, in your groups, and even with sources and assets.

Many of you may be familiar with Dr. Robert Cialdini and his principles of influence. If you are, then this will be a great refresher tailored to the individual patriot. If you’ve never heard of any of this, that’s even better–we’ll give you a fantastic overview. The CIA calls it RASCLS, and that’s the context we’ll be studying it in. Keep in mind that this is literally just an overview.  We’ll get into each of the skills individually and how you can use them in later parts of this series.

(Note: I’ll use the word “target” in this article, but it’s not a negative connotation. In tis context, it’s simply meant to denote whoever you’re using it on.)

Continue reading “Rapport and Influence Part 2: RASCLS”

Rapport and Influence Part 1: Why Do We Need It?

In an ongoing movement that has resistance and non-compliance as two of its most basic facets, often the skill of rapport-building falls by the wayside. Far too many see rapport-building as “sucking up” or “compromising,” when in reality it’s an incredibly necessary skill for the overall mission—both long-term for the greater cause and short-term for whatever situation you’re currently in or working on. Rapport is a necessary social currency. Those who choose not to carry it or earn it end up finding out that they are dead broke in other areas—like information, supplies, or even trustworthy personnel—when it matters most.

Continue reading “Rapport and Influence Part 1: Why Do We Need It?”