How to Make a Truly Anonymous Facebook Account Part I

There are plenty of articles about how to use social media without making your information public, or leaking it to various ad services and info-grabbing bots. That’s not what we’re doing. We’ll be setting up a Facebook account that is not linked to us in any way—even for those who know how to look. Keep in mind that this is NOT your standard alias account. This account not only hides your name and identity from others on Facebook, but it also hides your identity from people or agencies that might be tracking your activity–not by hiding your name, but by making you into someone else.

 

 

Why This Needs to Be Split Into Multiple Articles

Because people have short attention spans, and because the actual process of setting up the framework and getting this put together requires very careful adherence to the process. Before you even create the account, you need certain things set up—including your own head and mindset. This is a building block exercise. Today we are simply exploring the concept. Next we will start making the building blocks necessary to create and run that alternate identity on Facebook—and ultimately online in general.

Why Have a Fake/Anonymous Facebook Account?

  1. Because you want to join groups and communities without it being displayed on your personal page.
  2. Because you don’t want people in the groups you’re joining to know who you really are.
  3. Because you don’t want people who add you or interact with you to know who you are.
  4. Because you don’t want your information tracked or cataloged.
  5. Because you plan to use Facebook as a means to disseminate and/or collect information and propaganda that you don’t want linked to you.
  6. Because you plan to use this account to infiltrate a group.
  7. Because you plan to derail discussions or do some social engineering/rapport building/elicitation.
  8. Because you can, and you shouldn’t have to explain why to anyone.

Any one of these reasons is reason enough, and you may have other reasons not listed here. Whatever your thought process, let’s assume that you want/need an anonymous Facebook account that is not in any way traceable back to you. The nice thing is, this process is repeatable as many times as you need.

The Mindset You Need

In order for this to work, it needs to be used a certain way. Before undertaking this, think through your purpose in creating this account and what you want to do with it. Keep in mind that if you just want an alias account there are ways to do that. This isn’t a how-to for making an account where your name is listed as Bamf Fo Real, or Sheepdog Extraordinaire, or *Your Name* followed by a III.  That will not help you.

If you want an account where you have a new name and story, and you become someone else, that’s what this article is for.

DON’T try to make an anonymous account if:

  • You plan to immediately add all the same friends you already have.
  • You plan to use it to go right back to all of the same groups you’re already in.
  • You plan to talk to your friends and family or even known contacts with it.
  • You plan to list your location, hobbies, employer, or any other personal information.
  • You plan to use it in any way that mimics how you personally, currently use Facebook.
  • You cannot control your temper, need for attention, or need to be in charge of something.
  • You plan to use it to engage in any kind of drama involving people already in your life (such as spying on your significant other or sending jackass messages to your arch-nemesis).
  • You are too lazy to use it correctly (“I’m just gonna check this one thing quick while I’m here at home…”)

DO make an account if:

  • You are joining your local leftist/anti-gun/communist/liberal group and you need a new ‘identity’ to get into it.
  • You are planning to use the account for controlling discussion in various groups through tactics discussed elsewhere, such as these.
  • You plan to use it for disruption in certain groups, or releasing information that exposes people.
  • You don’t plan to really post anything but the kind of stuff your targets and/or groups are looking for and aren’t going to foster discussion on your page; you just want to be able to lurk.
  • You need to have a Facebook account to ‘back up’ the name or identity you’re giving people for your liberty activities.
  • You want to keep Uncle Sugar out of your liberty activities (if you plan to perform support functions and/or ‘gray’ activities, you need to keep Uncle Sugar out of your stuff).

Facebook is horrible. We all know that. However, there are times you may need to use it. This is for those times.

**Note: We are not advocating that you use this for illegal activity. We are not responsible if you decide to watch/buy/sell/interact illegal, immoral, or just plain disgusting stuff. Use your powers for good.

The Tools You Need

In order to pull this off, you need to have a few things in place. Setting up the account itself is rather simple, but you need to have a framework in place to make it as airtight as possible (keeping in mind that nothing is 100% perfect…this will definitely make them work for it, if they can get it at all). Here’s a basic list of things you need already set up. (We’ll go over these in more detail).

  1. Access to a VPN, ideally two. (check PrivacyTools.io for a list of solid VPNs that do not operate in the US.)
  2. An updated and current Tails OS running on a flash drive, or a virtual machine.
  3. The Tor Browser (found on Tails as well as a standalone for other uses)
  4. At least $20 in Bitcoin, already mixed, split, and sitting in an anonymous wallet (or five). Bonus points if you also have at least two other wallets in other cryptocurrencies and did some swapping back and forth there as well.
  5. A new name and basic cover (try this site if you get stuck thinking of a random name/identity).
  6. Patience.

What can we do with all of that? A lot.

In the next article we will walk through some of the steps necessary to set up your completely new identity on Facebook. In future articles we’ll go over how to flesh out that identity, give it some depth, and start using it for various activities even outside Facebook. In the meantime, get familiar with the tools and articles above, and start thinking about how to leverage them in your favor.

Guerrilla Support Operations Course May 3-4, 2016

Every guerrilla movement needs a support infrastructure. Supplies, communications, safe houses, contacts, networks. These are the things that often get lost in the never-ending push to “run and gun.” Who supplies those folks? Who makes sure they get to where they’re needed? Who gives them the information they need to operate? How do you cultivate the trusted networks necessary to get things done? This Guerrilla Support Ops class will show you.

Taught by John Mosby of MountainGuerrilla, this class will cover the support operations for your group and network. You’ll learn how to perform the critical functions that make things run, the networks behind the scenes, how to set them up, communicate with them, and get things and people where they need to be. This is not a class you’ll want to miss, whether you’re in an established pyramid style group or an autonomous cell-based group.

 

Please note: This is a weeknight class, broken up into 2 nights.

Tuesday, 3 May 2016
Wednesday, 4 May 2016

Location: Auburn, WA (specific location undisclosed)
Times: 1730-2100

All vetting and security protocols apply. This class will fill up fast, so get in NOW!

For general questions, contact us at towr@whiterose.us.

To apply for entry, email towr@hushmail.com.

 

6 Things You Should Never Do With a Burner Phone

I get a lot of questions about burner phones. What kind to buy, how to buy, where to buy. The problem is, people go buy them and then use them improperly—completely defeating the purpose.

There is most definitely a right and a wrong way to use a burner phone. We’ll talk about 6 things that you should never, ever, under any circumstances do with your burner. In fact, if you have one and you have EVER done any of these things, you can assume that anything you talked about or did while it was in your possession is already known by your adversary.

1. Buy your burner phone anywhere you normally are.

This one doesn’t necessarily deal with usage, but it’s necessary to mention. If your idea of tradecraft is going to the Wal-Mart 5 miles from your house instead of the Target that’s 2 miles from your house, then please slap yourself for me. Don’t buy it near your work, your home, don’t buy it at the gas station you normally go to, the quickie mart where you get your smokes at 10pm, or anywhere else you ever go to. In fact, it’s also a good idea to not go in your own car. Don’t do anything you normally do, don’t stop anywhere you normally stop, and whatever you do, don’t take your regular phone with you. Have a cover story just in case. Always have a cover.

2. Put all your contacts in your burner.

It might seem like common sense, but you’d be surprised at how many people go out of their way to purchase one “correctly,” and then immediately put their new phone side by side with their old one so they can put all their contacts in it. Or even worse, they simply log into their cloud account and download their contacts backup. I should not have to explain how beyond moronic this is. Burner phones are not for chatting people up. They’re for coordination, passing short bursts of time-sensitive information, etc. In other words, you use them if you have to, and only to speak to another burner phone.

3. Install all your regular apps.

Pay very close attention to these words from Grugq:

Just 4 apps are enough to reidentify users 95% of the time. A complete list of installed apps is unique for 99%.

Your burner phone is not your personal phone. Say that out loud to yourself until you understand it. Your burner has one purpose, and one purpose only. Don’t install Wickr on it and sign in with your regular username. Don’t install Candy Crush on it because that’s how you kill time with your regular phone. Don’t install that one app you can’t do without. Your burner is not your personal phone.

Read the rest at Patrick Henry Society. When you’re done, take a look at the Groundrod Primer class coming up. You need it.

SHTF Intelligence Course

Sam Culper of Forward Observer Magazine is teaching a SHTF Intelligence course in Spokane, WA in mid-March. If you haven’t taken this class yet, you need to–and if you’re one of the folks who have been asking us for an intelligence class in the Spokane area, we’ll simply point you in Sam’s direction for this one. He’s one of the best out there for this particular topic; he literally wrote the book on it. Here’s a taste of what you’ll be learning:

– threat identification
– threat analysis
– understanding the threat environment and you
– understanding the community security mission
– community security strategies
– the Intelligence Cycle
– how to gather intelligence information (specific for your locale)
– how to analyze incoming intelligence information
– how to set up a community intelligence section
– the fundamental tasks and responsibilities of the intelligence section
– Intelligence Preparation of the Battlefield & Community
– Area Assessments

There’s a lot more information on the FOMag website. If you want to know what’s really going on around you, if you truly want to understand the threats we face, and if you want to learn how to effectively deal with community intelligence then you need this course. Don’t wait until SHTF to care about this stuff—you need to understand SHTF Intelligence NOW.

As an added bonus, you can help out TOWR’s mission as well by attending! Sam has agreed to donate to TOWR for any students who we send to his course. So, go learn some critical skills AND let him know we sent you, so you can help us bring you more classes as well, such as the Groundrod Primer class in just a few weeks!

 

Tradecraft for Patriots: Moscow Rules Part 2

Yesterday we looked at the first part of the Moscow Rules, a list of operating protocols for CIA personnel stationed in Moscow during the Cold War. As we’ve discussed many times, security procedures are remarkably similar regardless of the field or group using them, including the Moscow Rules. Drug dealers, organized crime, and even terrorist groups use tradecraft, and a smart partisan will study their methods, see what works and what doesn’t, and learn from it.

In this article we’ll go through the second half of the Moscow Rules and what they mean to you as a well-rounded partisan.

  • Any operation can be aborted; if it feels wrong, then it is wrong.

Right out of the gate, we see another reference to trusting your gut. Yes, it’s that important. If you’re going out to train with your firearm and suddenly one of your guys wants to bring one of his buddies, if it feels wrong, don’t do it. If you’ve set up a buyer for your firearm and when you get there the guy doesn’t seem right, don’t sell. Use your head, trust your gut.

This brings me to another pair of points. We talked in the last article about people getting turned into informants against groups and individuals, as law enforcement looks to criminalize the patriot movement. The recent case of Schuyler Barbeau is a classic example of how informants are used to put people in jail. More importantly, it’s a quintessential case study in how NOT to act on social media. It’s also a perfect example of why you should vet the people you associate with. We’ll be doing an article specifically on the OPSEC failures in this case—not because we believe that Barbeau didn’t have the right to own an SBR. The Second Amendment secures the right of any citizen to own whatever they want, and to buy and sell that personal property as they see fit. However, the truth is that we live in enemy territory, so to speak. You can bet that Barbeau’s OPSEC and PERSEC failures are being used to full advantage by the authorities, and every single person he associated with is now getting their own info parsed out. The fact that his arrest and imprisonment is unconstitutional does not negate the fact that Barbeau made some basic mistakes. To ignore them is stupid and dangerous. We can be incensed about the unconstitutionality of his arrest while still admitting that mistakes were made and learning from them.

  • Keep your options open.

Again, self-explanatory. Don’t put all your eggs in one basket. Don’t be caught with only one plan and no backups.

  • If your gut says to act, overwhelm their senses.

You can figure out what this one means.

  • Use misdirection, illusion, and deception.
  • Hide small operative motions in larger non threatening motions.
  • Hide an SD card transfer in a friendly hug.

This speaks to some of the smaller gestures that we engage in. When transferring information between yourself and another party, make it a small motion encased in a bigger, innocent motion—such as hiding an SD card transfer in a hug or even handshake.

  • When free, In Obscura, immediately change direction and leave the area.
  • Break your trail and blend into the local scene.
  • Execute a surveillance detection run designed to draw them out over time.
  • Avoid static lookouts; stay away from chokepoints where they can reacquire you.

There is a decent tutorial on detecting and countering surveillance over at ITS Tactical. While you’re over there, check out their piece on performing a self-surveillance. It’s critical that you understand your own movements; you might realize that no matter how many “secure” text apps you have, your actions may be wide open.

  • Once is an accident; twice is a coincidence; three times is an enemy action.

This is one of the more important rules, and one that is pooh-poohed by a fair amount of people. The truth is that it goes back to trusting your gut. Some people—myself included—believe that coincidences rarely happen. If something seems wonky, that’s because it probably is. Pay attention to patterns; things that match, and things that don’t. Pay attention to people. Get training in seeing deception (the Statement Analysis class coming up in February is a fantastic start), and learn to detect changes in their conduct patterns. Learn what motivates the people around you and how that motivation may be used against them—and by extension, against you.

  • Select a meeting site so you can overlook the scene.
  • Keep any asset separated from you by time and distance until it is time.
  • If the asset has surveillance, then the operation has gone bad.
  • Only approach the site when you are sure it is clean.
  • After the meeting or act is done, “close the loop” at a logical cover destination.
  • Be aware of surveillance’s time tolerance so they aren’t forced to raise an alert.
  • If an alert is issued, they must pay a price and so must you.
  • Let them believe they lost you; act innocent.

These are all rules for setting up meetings. They seem pretty logical and obvious, but you’d be surprised at how many people don’t do them or even think of them. People like convenience, and if things are inconvenient (such as setting up a meeting properly, using secure comms or engaging in OPSEC), people don’t like to do them. It takes work to operate correctly. It takes vigilance and attention to detail. It only takes one mistake to compromise not only yourself, but everyone you work with. If you have people you trust to have your back, don’t screw them over by being lax in your dealings.

  • There is no limit to a human being’s ability to rationalize the truth.

The final Moscow rule deals with human nature. We’ve all seen it: the anti-gun liberal who refuses to see the truth, the family members who willfully ignore the situation in our country and prefer to pretend like everything is fine. Another hard and cold truth, however, is that patriots do it too. They refuse to practice safety and security. They refuse to believe that privacy is necessary. They refuse to believe that their Facebook chats and Zello meetings and emails are being watched. They refuse to believe that physical fitness is necessary. They refuse to accept that intelligence is a critical part of the equation, or that having zero knowledge about the irregular threats in their area is dangerous. They even refuse to accept that the people they work with might be untrustworthy or even working against them. The reasons for these rationalizations are myriad, and could fill up an entire series of articles. But the bottom line is that they happen.

As patriots we have to be smarter than that. We have to pay better attention, be willing to learn from our mistakes; in fact, we need to be willing to admit that the mistakes happen at all. Don’t rationalize, don’t sugarcoat. Take hard looks at yourself, your training, your ability to operate. Be willing to accept that you have deficiencies—we all do. Be willing to learn, have a teachable attitude, and seek out the training you’re missing. Start practicing your OPSEC. Start working on your intelligence preparation. Start doing the things you’re not doing now. Share the information and training that you possess, and learn from those who are better than you are.

Educate. Empower. Resist.